Marilyn Chin

Poet Marilyn Chin recites a haiku to the audience Thursday evening in Nedderman Hall. Chin did a few readings before taking time to answer audience questions and then having an autograph session.

Award-winning poet, writer and teacher Marilyn Chin performed her rhythmic exposition to a filled auditorium in Nedderman Hall during a spoken word poetry session Thursday night.

Chin read many excerpts from her work including "Blues on Yellow" and "Blues on Yellow 2." Chin said she is image-driven and thinks about Buddhist tales to influence her writing.

“I like how she takes elements of Chinese culture and mixes it with American culture," said Neill Matheson, English studies associate professor. "The performance was great.” 

Chin's most recent work, released in 2009, is Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen: A Manifesto in 41 Tales.

“The book is a book of tales," she said. "They are political allegories. That’s why it's called a manifesto.”   

Chin stated that it took her 10 years to write the book and that she lived with those tales for hours on end.

“I remember having 100 sonnets and keeping only one," Chin said. “There are many ways to write a poem."

Chin said she loves the poetry and likes creating hybrid forms.

“I’ve been working on 'sonnetnese,' ” she said. “Chinese Sonnets, a cross between Chinese and sonnets.”

Chin presented her poetry as part of the Visiting Writer Series. Bruce Krajewski, English studies chairman and professor, said the series is meant to inspire students in creative writing.

Along with reading her work, Chin offered advice to students toward the end of the presentation during a question and answer segment.

Chin said writers have to be patient to write and learn form everything, and that writers should give themselves deadlines to finish their task or else nothing will get done. 

“It’s a dog-eat-dog world, but I travel and rock out,” she said. “I enjoyed visiting Fort Worth and Arlington, but unfortunately, I failed in trying to find red cowboy boots.”

@juanrgovea

juan.govea@mavs.uta.edu

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