Delivery service to cater to late-night crowd

Psychology sophomore Christopher “C.J.” Gerron, marketing sophomore Garrett Martin and history sophomore Anthony Gonzales are working together to establish a late night delivery service for the UTA community called Mavs Munchie Express.

Three college students are starting up their own local business: A late-night food delivery service for the UTA community.

Marketing sophomore Garret Martin, history sophomore Anthony Gonzales and psychology sophomore Christopher “C.J.” Gerron used to make music together in the high school band in Mansfield. These days, the trio are more concerned with symphonies of flavors.

The idea came to fruition this summer on a lunch trip. The concept was bred out of a need the group had themselves, but also a need fellow college students had.

“We definitely wanted late-night deliveries,” Gonzales said.

College students are 87 percent more likely to order late-night meals than the average diner, according to a 2013 article by food delivery service GrubHub.

“We started talking to people just to see if there was actually a demand that other people wanted,” Gerron said. “I don’t think we’ve talked to someone yet who doesn’t want McDonalds at 11:30 to midnight.”

The group discussed the possibility of starting Mavs Munchie Express sporadically throughout the summer until they joined in mid-August to talk details, Gonzales said.

“We went to America’s Best Coffee in Mansfield and sat down, laid out everything we needed to do,” Martin said. “From there, the ball went rolling.”

The group’s pride and love for UTA and the surrounding area played a big part in the development of Mavs Munchie Express.

Martin has dreamed of being Mr. UTA and joined several campus organizations his freshmen year.

“We really believe in painting the town blue,” Martin said. “UTA has so much potential for spirit. That’s been a big goal of mine since being here. I feel like our business has the potential to rally up some school spirit.”

Gerron is a legacy student. His mom attended UTA.

“She was just like, ‘UTA is a really good school. I think you’d enjoy it,’ ” Gerron said. “ ‘You’re not the most outgoing type, and it’s not the most outgoing school.’ I do enjoy the community here now that I’ve gotten a feel for it.”

Gonzales is native to Michigan, but his family moved to Texas when his father was transferred to the Arlington GM plant, he said.

“I really thought that I would move back home. I really had my eyes on the University of Michigan for a while,” Gonzales said. “After being at UTA, I figured it’s nice here, and I’ll stick around.”

Gonzales attended UTA last year but is taking classes at Tarrant County Community College. He plans to return next semester.

“We’re all about the community and small business,” Gonzales said.

All three in the group are working outside of Mavs Munchie Express and taking classes full time. The three friends have spent late nights, staying up until 3 a.m. for about three weeks, Martin said.

“We’ll be sitting there talking, brainstorming and flipping through accounting books,” Martin said.

The whole operation is run out of Martin and Gerron’s apartment at Maverick Place, but the business partners hope to have a formal office and a full-time employee in the next six months. They also hope to expand the service to include grocery or laundry delivery, Martin said.

“We’re excited for where we’re going,” Gerron said.

Mavs Munchie Express will launch in the next couple of weeks, and the website will be up in about a week, the group said. Gerron said they will operate Fridays and Saturdays from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Delivery fees start at $5 for on and near campus and $7 for areas in Arlington stretching farther.

@Carla_Zano

carla.solorzano@mavs.uta.edu

This story has been updated with corrected information. Marketing sophomore Garret Martin’s name was misspelled in a previous version of this article.

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